Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant Visitors Center, Glen Rose

I’ll be honest, I probably would have never thought of taking a tour of the Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant, it was my husband’s idea.  I had made a comment about wanting to visit Comanche Peak, a landmark mesa in Somervel County for which the power plant gets it’s name.

However, it was really an extremely educational trip to the Visitors Center.  I admit I really knew nothing about nuclear power, and left not only a little more informed about it, but also about where I get my own power.

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1.   Reservations are required

FREE tours of the Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant Visitors Center require a reservation, and must be made in advance.  Call to schedule.(254) 897-5554

DON’T follow your GPS.  Mine took me to a farm 9 miles away, where I sat waiting for 30 minutes for someone to come unlock the gate.  Comanche Peak is located North of Glen Rose on FM 56.

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2.  It’s Educational

 The Visitor’s Center is filled with informational kiosk about Comanche Peak, nuclear power and the area.

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3. Security

Prior to 9-11,  you could take a tour of the plant itself.  Today, security is much tighter.

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4.  Play with the Geiger Counter 

My favorite exhibit was the working Geiger Counter, an instrument used for measuring ionizing radiation, which guest can use on everyday items, such as an alarm clock, a lantern mantle and an orange plate, all of which emit radiation.

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5.  Smile!  

My kids loved the photo op of stepping into a radiation suit!

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6.  Transporting the Waste  

It’s amazing how much testing is done on the shipping containers they use to transport the radioactive waste.  Train tracks run right outside the visitors center, which the waste is transported along.  I had hoped we would see some pass by, but we didn’t.

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7.  Interactive for Young Visitors

My six year old may not understand much about nuclear fission, but he did understand the concept of riding a bike to power a light or a tv.  He could also play tic-tac-toe on one of the screens.

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8.  Movie Theatre

Sit back and enjoy a 10 minute movie about the Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant.  BYOP – Bring Your Own Popcorn.

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9.  Training Center

After the movie, we were taken to an observation room of a copy of the real control room.  The room isn’t just used to give visitors a view of the control room, each worker is required to complete training hours in here.  

 

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 10.  Area Fossils

Glen Rose is known not only for their abundant fossils, but also for the dinosaur tracks that have been discovered along the Paluxy Riverbed.  There is a case devoted to showcasing some of these fossils.

11. Squaw Creek Reservoir

Comanche Peak is cooled by nearby Squaw Creek Reservoir.   With a depth of 125 ft. and surface area of over 3,000 acres, it is very deep and clear.  Fishing is allowed by reservation only, Friday – Sunday, at a cost of $30.  I was surprised at the cost, but told that anglers are happy to pay it because the bass fishing is so good on the lake.

Rumor has it that alligators have also been spotted on the lake.

Prior to 9/11, the lake was open for fishing, swimming and water sports and camping was allowed in the park.  Security restrictions have put a stop to all but reserved fishing.

© Having Fun in the Texas Sun , 2014.  Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Having Fun in the Texas Sun with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

12. More to do in Glen Rose

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Dinosaur Valley State Park offers camping, swimming, fishing and viewing world class dinosaur tracks along the Paluxy River.  Click HERE to read more about it.

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Fossil Rim is a Drive Thru Wildlife Park.  Click HERE to read more.

Having Fun in the Texas Sun! 

Michelle 

© Having Fun in the Texas Sun , 2014.  Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Having Fun in the Texas Sun with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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While all activities and attractions reviewed by Having Fun in the Texas Sun (HFitTS) are fun, they, as anything in life, hold some potential for accident or injury.  HFitTS is only offering their opinion and experience, and should be held harmless in case of accident.

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